Newsletter 18: October 2015

newsletter18In this issue we review the third of our Monitoring, Evaluation & Learning Initiative’s 2015 Country Visits; we delve into the Part 2 of our Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning Series, titled Promoting Social-Emotional Development; and we take a look back at the progression of ECD in the SDG agenda.

 

To download the full Newsletter follow this link:

 

Harvard University’s Center on the Developing Child: A resource for early childhood development

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Harvard University’s Center for the Developing Child have relaunched their website. The Center, whose mission is to drive science-based innovation that achieves breakthrough outcomes for children facing adversity, has put together a valuable resource pool of information on topics that range from the science that underpins resilience to the theories of change that support intervention strategies.

The site’s SCIENCE section organizes topics under two categories;

  1. Key concepts which are the building blocks of the science of child development. Each page in this section provides a concise overview of a different key concept and aggregates a variety of resources on the concept. Key concepts include brain architecture, serve and return, toxic stress, executive function & self-regulation, and resilience.
  2. Deep dives provide in-depth scientific content that is credible and understandable to non-scientists, and useful for public decision makers. Each deep dive section contains a variety of material based on research, including full-length reports, working papers, briefs, and multimedia. For now, deep dive pages exist on early childhood mental health, lifelong health, neglect, and gene-environment interaction.

Visit the site at http://developingchild.harvard.edu/science/ 

“Science tells us that early childhood is a time of both great promise and considerable risk. Having responsive relationships with adults, growth-promoting experiences, and healthy environments for all young children helps build sturdy brain architecture and the foundations of resilience. Meanwhile, significant disadvantages can disrupt the developmental process and lead to limited economic and social mobility that threatens the vitality, productivity, and sustainability of society.”

Newsletter 17: June 2015

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In this issue we speak to Pedro Maunde, ECD Project Manager for CARE International and one of the graduates of the SECD course about his experience of the course and its practical application in his work; we review the Parenting in Africa Network’s report on Opportunities for strengthening families through positive discipline; and we take a look at the social and emotional foundations for early learning in Part 1 of the series which explores social and emotional development in young children.

Newsletter 16: April 2015

newsletter16In this issue we recap on our 2nd Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning Initiative Convening which was held in Nairobi from the 9-11 February; we take a look at the upcoming Science of Early Childhood Development courses that will be offered in 2015 for Hilton Foundation-funded partners; and we review a paper on 6 key findings on the use of theories of change in international development.

A Place for Community Health Workers in Promoting Early Childhood Development

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A Place for Community Health Workers in Promoting Early Childhood Development

Effect of integrated responsive stimulation and nutrition interventions in the Lady Health Worker programme in Pakistan on child development, growth, and health outcomes: a cluster-randomised factorial effectiveness trial

“Stimulation and nutrition delivered through health programmes at a large scale could potentially benefit more than 200 million young children worldwide who are not meeting their developmental potential.”

community-healthcare-projectsIn an article published in The Lancet in June, 2014, authors Dr Aisha Yousafzai, Muneera Rasheed, Arjumand Rizvi, Robert Armstrong, and Prof Zulfiqar  Bhutta considering that stimulation and nutrition delivered through health programmes at a large scale could potentially benefit more than 200 million young children worldwide who are not meeting their developmental potential.  investigated the feasibility and effectiveness of the integration of interventions to enhance child development and growth outcomes in the Lady Health Worker (LHW) programme in Sindh, Pakistan. Results indicated that the responsive stimulation intervention can be delivered effectively by LHWs and positively affects development outcomes.

Yousafzai, A.K.,  Rasheed, M.A., Rizbi, A., Armstrong, R., Bhutta, Z.A. (2014). Effect of integrated responsive stimulation and nutrition interventions in the Lady Health Worker programme in Pakistan on child development, growth, and health outcomes: a cluster-randomised factorial effectiveness trial. The Lancet, 384 (9950)1282-1293.   doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(14)60455-4 

Recap: Monitoring, Evaluation & Learning Initiative 2nd Convening

The Hilton Foundation together with the HSRC Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning (MEL) Initiative team hosted the second workshop of the Foundation’s Children Affected by HIV and AIDS Initiative from the 9th-11th February 2015 in Nairobi, Kenya. The purpose of the 3-day workshop was to discuss key program challenges and opportunities, to revisit M&E strategies and reflect on learning to date. The workshop was attended by 65 participants, including in-country M&E and program staff, staff from the head-quarters of the 15 implementing partners, invited guests who work in the area of child development, and Shaheen Kassim-Lakha and Lisa Bohmer from the Hilton Foundation.

Download the full report on our 2nd convening, as well as the convening program here:

Presentations from the three-day convening are available for download below:

6 Key Findings on the Use of Theories of Change in International Development

theorychangeThe Theory of Change approach is becoming a widespread part of development practice, as a management tool, and increasingly as a common discourse which implementers use to explain and explore their interventions. Craig Valters’ paper titled ‘Theories of Change in international development: communication, learning or accountability?’ seeks to understand the actual effects of using a Theory of Change approach in international development work and considers how the approach may be better understood, if its aim is to improve development policy and practice. This paper provides an  analysis of how Theories of Change are used in the day-to-day practice of an international development organisation, The Asia Foundation, that uses the approach in three ways: to communicate, to learn, and to be held accountable, which each exist in some tension with each other.

Access the full paper here: 

Science of Early Child Development Courses 2015

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The Conrad N. Hilton Foundation and the Aga Khan University Institute for Human Development are pleased to announce the second year of courses in the Science of Early Child Development to partners of the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation in Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi, Zambia, and Mozambique. The courses are targeted to those that directly manage, assist and/or deliver early childhood development programming supported by the Foundation.

Click the link below for more about the 2015 SECD courses.

Application Form:

The Way to Beat Poverty

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The New York Times

SundayReview SEPT. 12, 2014

“If there’s one overarching lesson from the past few decades of research about how to break the cycles of poverty in the United States, it’s the power of parenting — and of intervening early, ideally in the first year or two of life or even before a child is born.”

This NY Times piece brings together evidence from a number of studies to make the case for early intervention, with an emphasis on promoting and supporting consistent and caring care-giving, to not only encourage the optimal development of children from infancy, but also to break the cycles of poverty that stem from the opportunity gaps in childhood.

Newsletter 15: December 2014

news1 15In this issue of our Newsletter we feature a piece from CARE Mozambique reflecting on training home visitors to provide practical and emotional support in their ECD programme; we review developments in the grant environment including 103 new grants/extensions from the Positive Action for Children Fund and a call from the World Bank for proposals on early childhood development programmes focusing on promoting the cognitive and socio-emotional development of children aged 3-6; and we take a look at the second and final piece in our Reading and Writing Series on promoting young children’s ability to write.

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